The Laws of Hammurabi

The Laws of Hammurabi

At the Confluence of Royal and Scribal Traditions

The Laws of Hammurabi is one of the earliest law codes, dating from the eighteenth century BCE Mesopotamia (ancient Iraq). It is the culmination of a tradition in which scribes would demonstrate their legal flair by composing statutes on a repertoire of traditional cases, articulating what they deemed just and fair. The book describes how […]
Fear of a Muslim Planet

Fear of a Muslim Planet

Global Islamophobia in the New World Order

Human rights lawyer Arsalan Iftikhar, AB ’99, JD ’03, takes on Islamophobia through the lens of the brutal Christchurch slaughter. In March 2019, a heavily-armed white supremacist walked into two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, and slaughtered 51 innocent Muslim worshippers while broadcasting on Facebook Live for the world to see. After the Christchurch mosque massacre, […]
Feeling Godly

Feeling Godly

Religious Affections and Christian Contact in Early North America

In 1746, Jonathan Edwards described his philosophy on the process of Christian conversion in “A Treatise Concerning Religious Affections.” For Edwards, a strict Congregationalist, true conversion is accompanied by a new heart and yields humility, forgiveness, and love—affections that work a change in the person’s nature. But, how did other early American communities understand religious affections […]
Making the World Over

Making the World Over

Confronting Racism, Misogyny, and Xenophobia in U.S. History

Political polarization and unrest are not exclusive to our era, but in the twenty-first century, we are living with seemingly unresolvable disagreements that threaten to tear our country apart. Discrimination, racism, tyranny, religious fundamentalism, political schisms, misogyny, “fake news,” border walls, the #MeToo moment, foreign intervention in our electoral process—these cultural and social rifts charge […]
Martin receives grant for African American religions project

Martin receives grant for African American religions project

Lerone A. Martin, at the university’s John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics, along with colleagues at Princeton University and the University of Pennsylvania, has received a $1 million grant from the Henry Luce Foundation to advance public understanding of the history, politics and cultures of African American religions.
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