Judging Inequality

Judging Inequality

State Supreme Courts and the Inequality Crisis

Social scientists have convincingly documented soaring levels of political, legal, economic, and social inequality in the United States. Missing from this picture of rampant inequality, however, is any attention to the significant role of state law and courts in establishing policies that either ameliorate or exacerbate inequality. In “Judging Inequality,” political scientists James L. Gibson and […]
WashU Expert: There is no end to forever

WashU Expert: There is no end to forever

The swift fall of Afghanistan to the Taliban apparently signals the end of a nearly 20-year conflict. But is it, asks Krister Knapp, a teaching professor of history in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis. Or is this simply the beginning of the next chapter of U.S/Afghan entanglements?
WashU Expert: Play it again, Uncle Sam

WashU Expert: Play it again, Uncle Sam

Rick and Ilsa, “Casablanca’s” ill-fated lovers, will always have Paris. Uncle Sam will always have Kabul. And Saigon. And Baghdad. In the long-running tragedy of American foreign entanglements, Uncle Sam has become less a hapless romantic idealist and more a cynical “love ’em and leave ’em” serial abuser, says veteran filmmaker Richard Chapman.
Afghanistan crisis was a predictable catastrophe

Afghanistan crisis was a predictable catastrophe

Without international pressure, the power-sharing agreement between Kabul and the Taliban was doomed, according to research by William Nomikos, assistant professor of political science in Arts & Sciences. But the political cost of continued occupation was too great.
Making the World Over

Making the World Over

Confronting Racism, Misogyny, and Xenophobia in U.S. History

Political polarization and unrest are not exclusive to our era, but in the twenty-first century, we are living with seemingly unresolvable disagreements that threaten to tear our country apart. Discrimination, racism, tyranny, religious fundamentalism, political schisms, misogyny, “fake news,” border walls, the #MeToo moment, foreign intervention in our electoral process—these cultural and social rifts charge […]
Executive orders come ‘at great cost’

Executive orders come ‘at great cost’

Like other modern presidents, executive orders may be the only path forward for Biden to deliver on his policy agenda, however these powers come at a great cost, according to Andrew Reeves, associate professor of political science iat Washington University in St. Louis.
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