Adia Harvey Wingfield

Adia Harvey Wingfield


Professor of Sociology

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Wingfield specializes in research that examines the ways intersections of race, gender, and class affect social processes at work. In particular, she is an expert on the workplace experiences of minority workers in predominantly white professional settings, and specifically on black male professionals in occupations where they are in the minority. Wingfield has lectured internationally on her research in this area, and her research has been published in numerous peer-reviewed journals including Social Problems, Gender & Society, Qualitative Sociology, and American Behavioral Scientist. She is the author of several books, most recently “Flatlining: Race, Work, and Health Care in the New Economy.”

In the media

We Built a Diverse Academic Department in 5 Years. Here’s How.

The takeaway from my experience at Wash U is that companies can do that with some core factors in place: firm, explicit support and resources from leadership; an intentional focus on racial diversity in hiring and advancement; and creating a culture that recognizes and responds to the realities Black workers face, writes Adia Harvey Wingfield.

Stories

Wingfield receives career award

Wingfield receives career award

Adia Harvey Wingfield, associate dean for faculty development and the Mary Tileston Hemenway Professor of Arts & Sciences, is the 2021 recipient of the American Sociological Association’s Race, Gender and Class section’s Distinguished Career Award.
Wingfield’s book wins C. Wright Mills Award

Wingfield’s book wins C. Wright Mills Award

Adia Harvey Wingfield, the Mary Tileston Hemenway Professor in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, received The Society for the Study of Social Problems’ C. Wright Mills Award for her 2019 book, “Flatlining: Race, Work, and Health Care in the New Economy.”
We Built a Diverse Academic Department in 5 Years. Here’s How.

We Built a Diverse Academic Department in 5 Years. Here’s How.

The takeaway from my experience at Wash U is that companies can do that with some core factors in place: firm, explicit support and resources from leadership; an intentional focus on racial diversity in hiring and advancement; and creating a culture that recognizes and responds to the realities Black workers face.
Unraveling complicated issues of inequality in workplaces, communities

Unraveling complicated issues of inequality in workplaces, communities

Adia Harvey Wingfield’s new book exposes how hospitals, clinics and other institutions participate in “racial outsourcing,” relying heavily on black doctors, nurses, technicians and physician assistants to do “equity work”— extra labor that makes organizations more accessible to communities of color.
How organizations are failing black workers — and how to do better

How organizations are failing black workers — and how to do better

Organizations need to reconsider how best to draw from black workers who bring different experiences, backgrounds, and strengths. It’s not enough to tiptoe around the fact that racial disparities persist. Head-on efforts to resolve these issues are necessary.
When black men are harassed

When black men are harassed

It is long overdue for women to receive the benefit of the doubt and for institutions to stop defending and protecting those who create unsafe work environments. But while women are finally being believed, sexual harassment and violence isn’t gender-specific.
Racism is stopping black men from solving our nursing shortage

Racism is stopping black men from solving our nursing shortage

While many have focused on the barriers to getting men in general to enter nursing, my research shows that black men, who are drastically underrepresented in nursing, may in fact be the group of men most motivated to enter the field, even despite an often racist environment.
Q&A: Adia Harvey Wingfield on sociology, women and the path ahead

Q&A: Adia Harvey Wingfield on sociology, women and the path ahead

Adia Harvey Wingfield, professor of sociology in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, recently was elected president of Sociologists for Women in Society (SWS), a national organization dedicated to improving the social position of women through feminist sociological research and writing. She discusses her plans for SWS, sociology and gender research, and why academics need to engage in public discourse.

Books

Flatlining

Flatlining

Race, Work, and Health Care in the New Economy

African American health care workers are there for a reason. A new book by a Washington University in St. Louis social scientist shows how hospitals, clinics and other institutions participate in “racial outsourcing,” relying heavily on black doctors, nurses, technicians and physician assistants to do “equity work” — extra labor that makes organizations and their services […]