Andrew Reeves


Associate Professor of Political Science

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Reeves teaches on American elections and voting behavior, the American presidency and executive branch politics.  His 2015 book, The Particularistic President: Executive Branch Politics and Political Inequality, examines how local accountability combined with the institutions of presidential elections causes presidents to disproportionately reward important constituencies with federal dollars, including the declaration of disaster relief.

In the media

Biden’s Supreme Court commission probably won’t sway public opinion

By creating a bipartisan panel of experts, Biden likely hopes to temper the politicization surrounding the debate and confer credibility on reforms he might pursue. However, once the time to push policy change arrives, Biden might find that public support for his reforms would have been the same had he not convened it, writes political science associate professor Andrew Reeves.

Stories

Executive orders come ‘at great cost’

Executive orders come ‘at great cost’

Like other modern presidents, executive orders may be the only path forward for Biden to deliver on his policy agenda, however these powers come at a great cost, according to Andrew Reeves, associate professor of political science iat Washington University in St. Louis.
2020 election talk: Congressional races

2020 election talk: Congressional races

Three political science experts at Washington University in St. Louis discuss the battle for control of the U.S. Senate and House. This roundtable discussion is the first of a two-part 2020 election series aimed to help listeners better understand the news, polls and issues in this year’s election.  
This pandemic is a test for leaders. Voters do the grading.

This pandemic is a test for leaders. Voters do the grading.

When disaster strikes, citizens are fearful, and some will blame elected officials for things beyond their control. But the lens of accountability is also sharpened. Partisanship will not protect our families or our livelihoods.
If Trump took responsibility for coronavirus missteps, it might actually help him

If Trump took responsibility for coronavirus missteps, it might actually help him

In one of the United States’ national myths, George Washington accepts responsibility for having chopped down a cherry tree — a story that’s held up as a sign of how deeply honorable our founding president was. Our research finds that leaders who claim the blame for their governments’ performance when crises strike also can reap rewards.