Nancy Morrow-Howell

Bettie Bofinger Brown Distinguished Professor of Social Policy

Nancy Morrow-Howell

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Biography

Morrow-Howell is director of the Harvey A. Friedman Center for Aging. A national leader in gerontology, she is widely known for her work on productive and civic engagement of older adults. She is editor of the book Productive Aging, published by Johns Hopkins University Press. She is a member of the Gerontological Society of America’s Expert Workgroup on Civic Engagement in an Older America. With support from the Metlife Foundation, The Atlantic Philanthropies, Longer Life Foundation, and the National Institute on Aging, she explores strategies to maximize the engagement of older adults in productive roles.

Stories

Morrow-Howell to receive leadership award

Nancy Morrow-Howell, the Bettie Bofinger Brown Distinguished Professor of Social Policy and director of the Harvey A. Friedman Center for Aging, will receive the Crown Leadership Award Nov. 6 from the Gladys and Henry Crown Center for Senior Living in University City.

Morrow-Howell named president of Gerontological Society of America

Nancy Morrow-Howell, PhD, the Bettie Bofinger Brown Distinguished Professor of Social Policy at the Brown School and director of the Harvey A. Friedman Center for Aging in the Institute for Public Health at Washington University in St. Louis, is the new president of the Gerontological Society of America, the nation’s largest multidisciplinary organization devoted to the field of aging.

Washington People: Nancy Morrow-Howell

Nancy Morrow-Howell, PhD, is a national leader in gerontology, widely known for her work on productive and civic engagement of older adults. She is also the Bettie Bofinger Brown Distinguished Professor of Social Policy at the Brown School, faculty director of productive aging research at the  Center for Social Development and director of the Harvey A. Friedman Center for Aging, part of the Institute for Public Health, all at Washington University in St. Louis.

When I’m 64: Imagining the future of aging

Today’s freshmen students have a 50 percent chance of living to see their 100th birthdays. They are in the middle of a demographic revolution that will shape every aspect of their lives. A new interdisciplinary course for freshmen introduced this fall, “When I’m Sixty-Four: Transforming Your Future,” aims to prepare students for this aging revolution and to encourage them to examine their present and future lives in more detail.