Steven Fazzari

Bert A. and Jeanette L. Lynch Distinguished Professor of Economics


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Fazzari’s research explores two main areas: the financial determinants of investment and R&D spending by U.S. firms and the foundations of Keynesian macroeconomics. A recent search found more than 1,100 citations to Fazzari’s publications in the Research Papers in Economics database (over 5,000 in Google Scholar). In addition, his research and commentary on public policy issues has been highlighted in the national media. Among other current research projects, Fazzari is now co-editing a book that investigates the sources and responses to the U.S. “Great Recession” that began in late 2007.

WashU in the News


Fazzari to chair new sociology department in Arts & Sciences

Steven Fazzari, PhD, a leading scholar on the relationship between rising income inequality and macroeconomic trends in the United States, will be chair of the recently re-established Department of Sociology at Washington University in St. Louis, Barbara A. Schaal, PhD, dean of the Faculty of Arts & Sciences, has announced.
Professor Steve Fazzari talks about the American Dream

Target: Shared prosperity

In “Economic Realities of the American Dream,” professors Steven Fazzari and Mark Rank examine the ­American Dream’s historical meaning, the ­traditional pathways to reach it, the current obstacles to achieving it and its viability in the future.

Steven Fazzari to be installed as the Bert A. and Jeanette L. Lynch Distinguished Professor

Steven Fazzari, PhD, will be installed as the Bert A. and Jeanette L. Lynch Distinguished Professor in a ceremony on Monday, April 21. He is the first  to receive this distinction in the Department of Economics, thanks to the generosity of the Lynches, who have provided for a total of three new professorships. The other two are named in honor of Douglass C. North, PhD, and the late Murray L. Weidenbaum, PhD.; these appointments will be made at a future date.

The American dream still possible, but more difficult to achieve, students discover

In a modern society struggling to loose the grip of a lengthy economic recession, is the American dream really attainable? The dream may still be possible, though much more difficult to achieve, say a renowned macroeconomist and one of America’s foremost experts on poverty, co-teachers of a course on the American Dream this semester at Washington University in St. Louis.