Jumping for joy

Jumping for joy

Alumna and future physician Eka Jose has been named a top 30 finalist for NCAA Woman of the Year, an elite honor for athletes who have demonstrated excellence in academics, athletics, service and leadership.
Bucking the trend

Bucking the trend

In the wake of the Great Recession, U.S. undergraduate degrees conferred in English language or literature fell roughly a quarter. Yet over the last three years, WashU’s English major has grown by about 30% — reflecting changes to how the department recruits, supports and communicates with undergraduate students.
Tennessee Williams vs. St. Louis

Tennessee Williams vs. St. Louis

Can you ever escape your past? Tennessee Williams spent a lifetime trying. His years in New York, New Orleans and Key West are the stuff of literary legend. But it was St. Louis where Williams lived longest, and St. Louis that shaped him as an artist and a person. So argues Henry I. Schvey in “Blue Song: St. Louis in the Life and Work of Tennessee Williams.”
CRE² launches podcast

CRE² launches podcast

The Center for the Study of Race, Ethnicity & Equity has launched a new podcast, “Everywhere with CRE².” The podcast plans to explore research from center faculty and fellows and dive deep into issues affecting St. Louis and the world.
Islands are cauldrons of evolution

Islands are cauldrons of evolution

Islands are hot spots of evolutionary adaptation that can also advantage species returning to the mainland, according to a study led by biologist Jonathan Losos in Arts & Sciences, published the week of Oct. 11 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
The new-new kids on the block: hybrid lizards

The new-new kids on the block: hybrid lizards

New research from the laboratory of Jonathan Losos begins to unravel one of the major mysteries of invasion biology: why animals that tend not to hybridize in their native range abandon their inhibitions when they spread into a new land. The study is published the week of Oct. 11 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Chang’e-5 samples reveal key age of moon rocks

Chang’e-5 samples reveal key age of moon rocks

A lunar probe launched by the Chinese space agency recently brought back the first fresh samples of rock and debris from the moon in more than 40 years. Now an international team of scientists, including Bradley Jolliff in Arts & Sciences, has determined the age of these moon rocks at close to 1.97 billion years old.
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