Caves, architecture & ‘Disappearing Ground’

Where do nature and design meet? And how does one create space within evolving nature? This fall, students in the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts explored those questions as part of “Disappearing Ground,” a speculative studio centering on Fogelpole Cave in Illinois.
In her new book, “MORAL COMBAT: How Sex Divided American Christians and Fractured American Politics” (Basic Books, 2017), Washington University's R. Marie Griffith offers a compelling history of the religious debates over sex and sexuality that came to dominate American public life.

New book by Griffith tackles timely subject

In her new book, “Moral Combat: How Sex Divided American Christians and Fractured American Politics” (Basic Books, 2017), Washington University’s R. Marie Griffith offers a compelling history of the religious debates over sex and sexuality that came to dominate American public life.

Enacting Caravaggio

“The Calling of St. Matthew” is a masterpiece of light and shadow. For the seminar “Caravaggio: Master and Murderer,” art historian William Wallace enlisted students and colleagues from the Performing Arts Department in Arts & Sciences to explore the painting’s mysteries.
Illustration of an open book

Must-reads

On topics from Eisenhower to atheists, here are the latest faculty and alumni books that are sure to provoke, delight and enlighten.

Quoted: Hold That Thought

These quotes are from Hold That Thought, a podcast produced by Arts & Sciences, where in 15 minutes you can learn about the allure of Shakespeare, the most attractive personality traits or the secrets stored in rocks.

The game of life

When Sam Coster, AB ’12, was diagnosed with stage 4 cancer at age 23, he knew his life had to change. A game developer who made irreverent endless runners for mobile, Coster and his brothers, who run the game development studio Butterscotch Shenanigans, decided to create their most imaginative and ambitious game to date, Crashlands.