Rethinking seizures associated with cardiac disease

Rethinking seizures associated with cardiac disease

Research from Washington University in St. Louis finds that mutations of a gene implicated in long QT syndrome in humans may trigger seizures because of their direct effects on certain classes of neurons in the brain — independent from what the genetic mutations do to heart function. The new work from Arts & Sciences was conducted with fruit flies and is published August 8 in PLOS Genetics.
When Bill Gass introduced Toni Morrison

When Bill Gass introduced Toni Morrison

Toni Morrison, who died Aug. 5 at the age of 88, was among the most powerful, popular and influential writers of her generation. Introducing her to a packed Graham Chapel in 1991, William Gass, professor, declared that “Beloved,” which had won the Pulitzer Prize three years earlier, “has the old roar of the great work, back in the days when great works roared.”
G’Sell nominated for Rabkin Foundation Award

G’Sell nominated for Rabkin Foundation Award

Eileen G’Sell, senior lecturer in writing and in the Prison Education Project, both in Arts & Sciences, was a finalist in the 2019 Dorothea and Leo Rabkin Foundation grant program for visual art journalists.
Stark world premieres in LA, San Francisco

Stark world premieres in LA, San Francisco

This summer, Christopher Stark, assistant professor of music in Arts & Sciences, presented two world-premiere compositions at major venues for contemporary classical music.
Sometimes you feel like a nut

Sometimes you feel like a nut

A long-term study of western gorillas in Gabon has revealed an unexpected behavior: they use their teeth to crack open and eat nuts. New research by Adam van Casteren, lecturer in biological anthropology in Arts & Sciences, may have important implications for the way researchers predict the diet of human ancestors based on the shape of their teeth.