Henry “Roddy” Roediger III

James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences

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Biography

An internationally recognized scholar of human memory function, Roediger’s research interests include such topics as how people can suffer memory illusions and false memories (remembering events differently from the way they happened or remembering events that never happened at all), implicit memory (when past events affect ongoing behavior without one’s awareness) and, most recently, applying cognitive psychology to improving learning in educational situations.

WashU in the News

Stories

Courtroom testimony

Misinformation may improve event recall, study finds

Research on eyewitness testimony has shown that false details put forth during an interrogation can lead some people to develop vivid memories of events that never happened. While this “false memory” phenomenon is alive and well, new research suggests that a bit of misinformation also has potential to improve our memories of past events — at least under certain circumstances.
Henry "Roddy" Roediger photo

Roediger receives lifetime achievement award

Henry L. “Roddy” Roediger III, an internationally recognized scholar of human memory and the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor in Arts & Sciences, has received the the 2016 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society for Experimental Psychology and Cognitive Science.
Henry "Roddy" Roediger photo

Roediger receives mentor award from Association for Psychological Science

Henry L. “Roddy” Roediger III, an internationally recognized scholar of human memory and the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor in Arts & Sciences, has received the 2016 Mentor Award from the Association for Psychological Science.
Alexander Hamilton on $10 bill

Memory test: Which president is this?

Alexander Hamilton, Benjamin Franklin, Hubert Humphrey and some guy named “Thomas Moore” are among the names that many Americans mistakenly identify as belonging to a past president of the United States, finds a news study by memory researchers at Washington University in St. Louis.