Lee Epstein

Ethan A.H. Shepley Distinguished University Professor

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Biography

Lee Epstein is the Ethan A.H. Shepley Distinguished University Professor at Washington University in St. Louis. Her research and teaching interests center on law and legal institutions, especially the behavior of judges.

A recipient of 12 grants from the National Science Foundation, Epstein has authored or co-authored more than 130 articles and essays and 18 books, including The Choices Justices Make (co-authored with Jack Knight), which won the Pritchett Award for the Best Book on Law and Courts and, more recently, the Lasting Contribution Award “for a book or journal article, 10 years or older, that has made a lasting impression on the field of law and courts.”

The Constitutional Law for a Changing America series (co-authored with Thomas Walker), now in its 10th edition, received the Teaching and Mentoring Award from a section of the American Political Science Association (APSA).

Recent books are The Behavior of Federal Judges, with William M. Landes & Richard A. Posner (Harvard University Press); An Introduction to Empirical Legal Research, with Andrew D. Martin (Oxford University Press); and The Oxford Handbook on U.S. Judicial Behavior (edited with Stefanie A. Lindquist).

WashU in the News

Stories

Judging the Supreme Court

Judging the Supreme Court

The justices of the nation’s highest court have a bird’s-eye view of the nation’s discord. But Lee Epstein trains her binoculars on them as they do their work.
Epstein named visiting professor at University of Bergen

Epstein named visiting professor at University of Bergen

Lee Epstein, the Ethan A. H. Shepley Distinguished University Professor, has accepted a visiting professor appointment in comparative politics and in law at the University of Bergen in Bergen, Norway.
Presidential candidates and their possible Supreme Court picks

Presidential candidates and their possible Supreme Court picks

How might the makeup of the United States Supreme Court change depending on who is elected as the country’s next president? A new analysis from Washington University in St. Louis estimates where the candidate’s potential nominees fit compared with the current justices and finds that a Democratic appointee would move the middle of the court to the left, shifting the court’s balance of power.