Lerone A. Martin

Director, American Culture Studies

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Biography

Lerone A. Martin, PhD is the Director of American Culture Studies and associate professor of religion and politics, American Culture Studies and African and African American Studies. His research primarily focuses on religious and political history, the African American experience and the FBI.

In support of his research, Martin has received a number of nationally recognized fellowships and grants, including the National Endowment for the Humanities, The American Council of Learned Societies and The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation.

Martin is the author of the award-winning Preaching on Wax: The Phonograph and the Making of Modern African American Religion (New York University Press, 2014), which tracks the role of the phonograph in the shaping of African American religion, culture, and politics during the first half of the twentieth century. He is currently writing a book tentatively entitled: Apostles of Justice:  How Hoover’s FBI Aided and Abetted the Rise of White Evangelical Conservatism. The book is set to be published by Princeton University Press.

 

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Stories

WashU Expert: Religion and the 2020 election

WashU Expert: Religion and the 2020 election

According to Lerone A. Martin, director of American Culture Studies and associate professor of religion and politics and of African and African-American studies, all in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, modern evangelical voters have supported political candidates for myriad reasons, not all of which are in line with traditional Christian values.
Martin to launch humanities program for promising local students

Martin to launch humanities program for promising local students

Lerone A. Martin, associate professor of religion and politics and incoming director of the American Culture Studies program in  Arts & Sciences, received a $250,000 grant from The Teagle Foundation to develop and implement a summer humanities program for promising, underserved high school students from the St. Louis region.