Timothy McBride

Bernard Becker Professor

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Biography

Timothy McBride is an influential health policy analyst and leading health economist shaping the national agenda in health insurance, health reform, rural health care, Medicare and Medicaid policy, health economics and access to health care.

McBride studies the effects of health reform at the state and national levels, the uninsured, diabetes policy, Medicare Advantage, and long-term entitlement reform.

Her is co-director of the Center for Health Economics and Policy (CHEP) at the Institute for Public Health at Washington University.

McBride has been active in testifying before Congress and consulting with policy constituents on health reform, health insurance issues and rural health policy. He is a member of the Rural Policy Research Institute Health Panel that provides expert advice on rural health issues to the U.S. Congress and other policymakers.

McBride serves as a member of several national committees and boards, including the Methods Council for Academy Health and the St. Louis City Board of Health. He currently serves as chair of the state of Missouri’s MOHealthNET Oversight Committee, which advises the state’s Medicaid program.

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Stories

WashU Experts: Coronavirus challenges facing rural America

WashU Experts: Coronavirus challenges facing rural America

As the coronavirus spreads across the United States, larger cities, like New York and Seattle, are dealing with increasing numbers of infections and deaths daily. However, less populated rural areas are not immune from the disease, say two public health experts at Washington University in St. Louis, and controlling it in rural America presents a unique set of challenges.
WashU Expert: Coronavirus crisis highlights need for health insurance in Missouri and other states

WashU Expert: Coronavirus crisis highlights need for health insurance in Missouri and other states

Tim McBride, the Bernard Becker Professor at Washington University in St. Louis’ Brown School and a leading health economist, said that the coronavirus outbreak will exacerbate problems in Missouri’s public health systems, which were already underfunded relative to most of the rest of the country, as well as issues facing low-income residents with challenges accessing medical care.