Daniel Epps

Associate professor of law

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Biography

Daniel Epps, former law clerk to Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, is associate professor of law.

Epps focuses on criminal law and criminal procedure – and his scholarly approach draws upon history, philosophy, political science and economics.

He is currently working on projects about the role of the jury, the Supreme Court’s case-selection process and the harmless-error doctrine.

In addition to his scholarship, Epps co-hosts a seasonal podcast about the Supreme Court with Ian Samuel, a former clerk for Justice Scalia who is currently a fellow at Harvard Law School. First Mondays is available on iTunes and also has a twitter feed that stays up to date on all things Supreme Court.

WashU in the News

Stories

WashU Expert: How to save the Supreme Court

WashU Expert: How to save the Supreme Court

During the July 30 Democratic presidential debate, candidate Pete Buttigieg renewed his calls to “depoliticize the Supreme Court with structural reform.” Buttigieg has endorsed a Supreme Court reform proposal offered by Daniel Epps, associate professor of law at Washington University in St. Louis.
A simple plan for saving the Supreme Court

A simple plan for saving the Supreme Court

If Judge Brett Kavanaugh is confirmed to the Supreme Court, Republicans will have succeeded in a decades-long effort to take the courts in a more conservative direction. While they will surely celebrate this victory, the real loser in this partisan battle is not the other side — it’s the Supreme Court. And without radical reforms to save its legitimacy, the Court may never recover from its transformation into a nakedly partisan institution.
Police officers are bypassing juries to face judges

Police officers are bypassing juries to face judges

The city where I live and work has been roiled by protests after the acquittal of former city police officer Jason Stockley on first-degree murder charges for his 2011 shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith. Again, to many of us, the justice system seems unwilling to hold law-enforcement officers to account for violence against people of color.