John Inazu

Sally D. Danforth Distinguished Professor of Law and Religion

John Inazu

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Biography

Inazu’s scholarship focuses on the First Amendment freedoms of speech, assembly, and religion, and related questions of legal and political theory. His most recent book, Confident Pluralism: Surviving and Thriving Through Deep Difference, argues that we can and must live together peaceably in spite of deep and sometimes irresolvable differences over politics, religion, sexuality and other important matters.

WashU in the News

Stories

Judge Barrett’s religion not a confirmation issue

Judge Barrett’s religion not a confirmation issue

Questions about Amy Coney Barrett’s religious affiliation and beliefs have dominated public discussion since President Trump announced that she was his pick to fill the U.S. Supreme Court seat left vacant by Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s passing. While her Catholicism is considered controversial by some, should it impact her confirmation? A Washington University in St. Louis law professor weighs in.
Amy Coney Barrett, Handmaids and Empathy for the Unfamiliar

Amy Coney Barrett, Handmaids and Empathy for the Unfamiliar

“How do we affirm and extend the ethic that welcoming religiously diverse people, nurturing positive relations among them, and facilitating their contributions to the nation is part of the definition of America?” When it comes to the religious practices of our fellow citizens, the answer to that question begins with a commitment to empathy and charity rather than bigotry or ignorance.
Bookshelf: Living faithfully in a world of difference

Bookshelf: Living faithfully in a world of difference

In a society that is increasingly diverse yet less tolerant, how can Christians live faithfully while respecting those whose beliefs are radically different? A Washington University in St. Louis scholar says before we can find common ground with others, we must start by acknowledging and being comfortable with our own beliefs that make us different.
Close the Churches

Close the Churches

As the Christian author Andy Crouch recently advised, one of the best ways to demonstrate that love now is by suspending physical gatherings, including worship services—for the sake of our neighbors.

Books

Confident Pluralism

Surviving and Thriving Through Deep Difference

In “Confident Pluralism,” John D. Inazu analyzes the current state of the country, orients the contemporary United States within its broader history, and explores the ways that Americans can—and must—strive to live together peaceably despite our deeply engrained differences. Inazu not only argues that it is possible to cohabitate peacefully in this country, but also […]